mypubliclands:

Add Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area to Your Bucket List!  #SeeBLM #GetOutdoors

In 1993, Congress established the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in Idaho to protect a unique environment that supports one of the world’s most dense concentrations of nesting birds of prey. Falcons, eagles, hawks and owls are found here in unique profusion and variety. The Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009 officially added the name of conservationist Morley Nelson to the NCA, in honor of Nelson’s work on behalf of birds of prey and their habitats.

A part of the National Conservation Lands, the BLM manages the area to preserve its remarkable wildlife habitat while providing for other compatible uses of the land, so that birds of prey flourish here as they have for thousands of years.

In addition to outstanding bird and wildlife viewing, this area hosts various recreational opportunities. Visitors can sightsee, ride on horseback, hike, mountain bike, picnic and camp.

Learn more about the NCA and about birds of prey: http://on.doi.gov/1sAD0aG

Photo by Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist

Reblogged from mypubliclands

renatagrieco:

July 3, 2014 - White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)
Requested by: tieltavern
These birds are found in woodlands throughout the United States and into Canada and Mexico. Their name comes from their habit of wedging nuts and acorns into tree bark and striking them with their beaks to break the shells, although they also eat insects. They often store seeds for winter by wedging them into tree bark and covering them with lichen, moss, bark, or snow. Nuthatches often forage in mixed species flocks with chickadees and titmice in the winter, this makes it easier for the birds to find food and to watch for predators. Breeding pairs stay together through the year, but the female builds the nest by herself in a tree cavity.

One of my favorite birds.

renatagrieco:

July 3, 2014 - White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis)

Requested by: tieltavern

These birds are found in woodlands throughout the United States and into Canada and Mexico. Their name comes from their habit of wedging nuts and acorns into tree bark and striking them with their beaks to break the shells, although they also eat insects. They often store seeds for winter by wedging them into tree bark and covering them with lichen, moss, bark, or snow. Nuthatches often forage in mixed species flocks with chickadees and titmice in the winter, this makes it easier for the birds to find food and to watch for predators. Breeding pairs stay together through the year, but the female builds the nest by herself in a tree cavity.

One of my favorite birds.

Reblogged from renatagrieco